Venue

GeoChina International Conference will be hosted in NanChang, China.

Nanchang (Chinese: 南昌, Nanchang dialect: Lantsong) is the capital of Jiangxi Province in southeastern China. Nanchang is the largest city in Jiangxi Province. Nanchang is located in the central part of Jiangxi Province, with a history of more than 2,200 years. It was called “Yuzhang” during the Han dynasty, and “Hongdu” and “Hongcheng” from the Tang to Song dynasties. It is located in the hinterland of Yuzhang Plain.

Nanchang is a city of long history. As early as 50,000 years ago, clans inhibited the Anyi region of the Nanchang city. About three thousand years ago, to the north Aixi Lake, south of Qingyun Pu, the arc of the formation of ancient Nanchang gathering area residents.

Han Emperor five years (202 BC), Han Guan Ying the local garrison, located Yu Zhang County, next year the construction of the city, site in this city about 4 kilometres (2.5 miles) southeast of Nanchang Railway Station Huang Temple City, the city perimeter miles eighty-four step, called "Guan Ying City", it was built to create a history of Nanchang city. First built "Nanchang County," Yu Zhang county of Gunji, take "grand southern" and "Southern prosperity," meaning, named "Nanchang." The territories encompassing modern-day Jiangxi Province—including Nanchang—was first incorporated into China during the Qin dynasty, when it was conquered from the Baiyue peoples and organized as Jiujiang Commandery (Chinese: 九江郡). In 201 BC, during the Han dynasty, the city was given the Chinese name Nanchang and became the administrative seat of Yuzhang Commandery (豫章郡), and was governed by Guan Ying, one of Emperor Gaozu of Han's generals. The name Nanchang means "southern flourishing", derived from a motto of developing what is now southern China that is traditionally attributed to Emperor Gaozu himself.

In AD 589, during the Sui dynasty, this commandery was changed into a prefecture named Hongzhou (洪州), and after 763 it became the provincial center of Jiangxi, which was then beginning the rapid growth that by the 12th century made it the most populous province in China.

In 653 the Tengwang Pavilion was constructed, and in 675 Wang Bo wrote the classic "Tengwang Ge Xu", a poetic introductory masterpiece celebrating the building, making the building, the city, and the author himself known to literate Chinese-speaking population ever since. The Pavilion has been destroyed and rebuilt several times throughout history. Its present form was reconstructed in the 1980s after being destroyed in 1929 during the Chinese Civil War.